Mount Buller to Mount Stirling

Visiting Mt Buller for some skiing or mountain biking this year? Don’t feel like hitting the slopes? If you’d prefer to head out in your hiking boots, this walk will give you a fantastic view of the Victorian Alps along trails in truly beautiful country.

Beginning in the alpine town of Mt Buller, head out along Chamois Road with the centre of town behind you. You will come across a staircase leading down to the Village Circuit Track, often used as a cross-country skiing trail. Follow it past the water treatment facility until you hit the unsealed Cornhill Road. This road will lead you around a bend before Cornhill Track takes you up into the bush.

From here the route is fairly straightforward all the way to the summit of Mt Stirling. First, however, there’s a long, steep descent into Howqua Gap, where the huts and camping area make a great place to stop and have a rest before tackling the ascent to Stirling. The Howqua Gap Trail, which leads you to the summit, is always fairly clear underfoot and easy to locate, but the steep climbs and descents each way make this a challenging walk.

You’ll pass through some extraordinary snow gum forests as you make your way to the Stirling summit, where the trees give way to a beautiful alpine plain. From the summit, watch crows lifting off and butterflies weaving around you, and take a break to recover your strength before tackling the return journey.

This is a great walk to build up strength and fitness while enjoying the peaceful quiet of the summits – a good getaway from the noise and bustle of the ski village!

SUMMARY

  • A great day’s excursion while staying at Mt Buller.
  • Steep climbs and descents going both ways.
  • Spectacular views of the surrounding mountains.
  • Not advisable for snowy conditions; always carry a map.

LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY

EASE OF ACCESSIBILITY

WILDLIFE

SCENERY

OVERALL


Ale author photo.jpg

Alex Mullarky

Alex Mullarky is a writer and environmentalist from the UK who has called Melbourne home since 2014. She is a graduate of English Literature and is particularly interested in the connection between language and landscape.


You can find her on Twitter at @saesteorra