Tarra-Bulga National Park

Tarra-Bulga is one of the lesser known temperate rainforests we have in Victoria, tucked away in South Gippsland in the Tarra Valley. Even the drive to the park feels magical. As you wind your way through the tall cliffs of the valley, water cascades down through the rainforest into the Tarra River, which runs beside you. As the car creeps upwards, the air becomes crisper and you leave the rushing sounds of the river – and the rest of the world – behind you.

There are a number of different trails to explore at Tarra-Bulga, as well as picnic and camping areas if you wish to make a day (or two) of it. The Tarra Valley Rainforest Walk is a short and easy stroll to Cyathea Falls, which is a small but beautiful waterfall that you could very well have all to yourself.

Images: Ella Kelly

Images: Ella Kelly

Image: Ella Kelly

Image: Ella Kelly

If you have a bit more time, make your way to Corrigan’s Suspension Bridge – head out from the Visitor Centre Carpark via the Lyrebird Ridge, Ash, and Wills Tracks. This secluded suspension bridge gives you a fantastic view, allowing you to take in the sights from above and get a different perspective of the forest canopy. (And if you’re super lucky, it may look like this.)

But possibly the thing I enjoyed most at Tarra-Bulga was simply wondering along the rainforest paths. You will feel dwarfed by the towering mountain ash trees as you wind your way through the thickets of ferns and fallen logs that make up the crowded understory. The air is filled with the sounds of male lyrebirds calling to attract mates, and if you go quietly you may even catch a glimpse of one running across the path – they are everywhere!

Image: Ella Kelly

Image: Ella Kelly

Summary

  • Towering mountain ash forests

  • Quiet and easy walks; wide paths with some stairs and steep inclines

  • Highlights include Cyathea Falls and Corrigan’s Suspension Bridge

  • Abundant local wildlife, particularly lyrebirds

  • Fantastic atmosphere - a real escape from the world!

 

 

Level of difficulty:

Ease of accessibility: 

Wildlife:

SCENERY:

Overall:


Ella Kelly

Ella is a PhD Candidate at the University of Melbourne, where she spends a lot of time thinking about why some quolls don’t eat cane toads (if only she could ask them!). She also enjoys talking and writing about science, and would ultimately love to have an actual impact on the conservation of Australia’s biodiversity.

You can find her on Twitter at @ecology_ella


Banner image courtesy of Ella Kelly.